State 4-H Congress

77th Annual Tennessee 4-H Congress

March 10 – 13, 2024

Embassy Suites Nashville SE

Murfreesboro, TN

Welcome to the Tennessee 4-H Congress website! We’re glad you made it here and hope you’ll stick around long enough to find out what Congress is all about. Please enjoy looking around the site. We’re always working on it so check back often! Be sure to let us know what you think. We’d love to hear from you.

Interested in becoming a Tennessee 4-H Congress delegate?

Attendance Information

Two 4-H senators who are senior Level I 4-H members (ninth through tenth graders) may attend from each county. 4-H representatives, one senior Level I 4-H member representing each 1,700 or major fraction thereof of the total county enrollment, and one senior Level I 4-H member for each sixty or major fraction thereof of the total county senior enrollment make up the remaining delegates. Each delegate attending Tennessee 4-H Congress must have an essay prepared on the Congress theme, “Tennessee 4-H: Find Your Missing Piece.” One volunteer leader may attend from each county. Others who may attend include the state 4-H staff, state Extension administrative personnel, Tennessee 4-H Foundation members, and county Extension personnel designated by regional UT Extension staff to accompany county groups.

Three 4-H Ladies

Purpose

  1. To recognize outstanding 4-H’ers and leaders from all Tennessee counties.
  2. To provide new opportunities for 4-H’ers and leaders to develop a better understanding of citizenship and see how it relates to daily living.
  3. To offer new and stimulating leadership experiences for 4-H’ers and leaders on a statewide basis.
  4. To provide the opportunity for 4-H’ers and leaders to learn how their state government functions.
  5. To encourage 4-H’ers and leaders to assume and continue leadership roles in their communities.
  6. To provide opportunities for 4-H’ers to develop a greater appreciation of the history and heritage of Tennessee.  

Preparing for Congress

Tennessee 4-H Congress is an activity that supports the Citizenship project and helps 4-H’ers develop the life skill of responsible citizenship. Responsible citizenship is an individual’s demonstration of love and devotion in response to duties, rights, and privileges as a member of a community or country. It includes:

  • Loyalty to one’s place of residence.
  • The entitlements and privileges of citizenship, including voting, protection, participation in government.
  • Obligations of citizenship.
  • Appreciating and valuing diversity.

One way to be a responsible citizen is to understand your government and how you can be involved so that your government represents you and other citizens. Democratic governments are established to be operated by the people and for the people. Citizen involvement in government is the only way to keep government responsive to the people.

How much do you know about your government? To help you get the most benefit from your participation in Tennessee 4-H Congress, you should look in books and on the Internet to learn more about how government works, especially in Tennessee. You will find links and information on this website that will help you get the most out of your Congress experience.

Who are the leaders in your state government? How are they elected? How does a bill become a law? What happens if the governor vetoes a bill? If you know the answers to these and other interesting questions about state government, you will be better prepared to serve as a Tennessee 4-H Congress senator or representative.

Cost

The Congress registration fee is $330. All state finalists, regional speaking winners, State 4-H Congress officers, and volunteer leaders attend on scholarships. Registration is done through each county office.

Arrival and Departure

Congress registration will be held at the Embassy Suites Nashville SE in Murfreesboro on Sunday, March 10, 2024. The opening assembly will be Sunday evening. Congress will end Tuesday evening, March 12, 2024, with the Citizenship Banquet, followed by a farewell dance.

Rooms and Meals

All delegates will be housed by regions in the Embassy Suites Nashville SE located at 1200 Conference Center Boulevard in Murfreesboro. Most meals will be “special events” sponsored by various friends of 4-H. Monday night dinner and Wednesday breakfast will be on your own. The official Congress headquarters will be in the Embassy Suites Nashville SE. Should parents or guardians need to get in touch with delegates during Congress, they should call the Embassy Suites Nashville SE at 615-890-4464. 

Educational Tours

Nashville is a city with natural beauty, culture, and more than 200 years of history. While in the city, delegates will enjoy a visit to the Tennessee State Capitol and the Legislative Plaza. They may also choose to visit the impressive Tennessee State Museum and stroll down the cobblestone streets of historic downtown Nashville. Delegates will also enjoy a trip to the Nashville Zoo.

What to Bring/Wear

Knowing what to wear for Tennessee 4-H Congress can be a challenge…especially if this is your first time to the event. Keep in mind you are representing your county as well as the 4-H program. You will be interacting with state officials, legislators, 4-H donors, and others. It is better to be “over-dressed” than “under-dressed.” The most important and most basic guideline is that your general appearance should be neat and clean. To help you plan, use the following dress code. 

Be a Good Delegate

As a Tennessee 4-H Congress delegate, you are serving as a 4-H ambassador. You represent more than 184,000 other Tennessee 4-H’ers. Represent them well through your active participation, courteous behavior, and professional dress throughout Congress. Here are a few reminders: 

  1. Make it a point to be on time or ahead of time for each session and event.
  2. Be a good listener. Some important donor representatives, university officials, and 4-H alumni will be speaking during Congress. Impress them by your attentiveness.
  3. Cellphones are out of place at any meal event or assembly.
  4. Show your appreciation by writing thank-you notes to sponsors, leaders, agents, and parents.
  5. Share your experiences with others when you return home. Take notes and be prepared to give an interesting and worthwhile account of your Congress experience.

Activity and Event Acceptance Form

Before coming to State 4-H Congress, delegates and their parents or guardians must sign Form 600-A: 4-H Activity and Event Acceptance Form (available from the county Extension office or the Tennessee 4-H Forms and Materials page). When delegates sign this form, they are agreeing to follow all rules and guidelines for participation. 

4-H Congress Scholarship

In support of youth development pursuits, Tennessee State University Cooperative Extension, the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, and donors to Tennessee 4-H Foundation dedicate a portion of its resources to scholarship programs benefiting Tennessee 4-H members to attend Congress. The Universities and 4-H Foundation are pleased to announce that we will be able to provide $7,590 in scholarship support through 23 scholarship opportunities in the amount of $330.00. The scholarships will be awarded in February and will provide complimentary registration. The awarded scholarship does not cover the cost of transportation.

The information packet (MS Word version and PDF version) describes the available scholarship opportunity. The scholarship has its own eligibility criteria and application requirement, which are detailed in the packet. Applications must be submitted by Thursday, January 25, 2024, and must be submitted using the following link:

https://tinyurl.com/4-Hminorityscholarship2024

Please review the packet carefully. If you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact your county Extension office or call Tennessee State University Cooperative Extension at 615-963-1351. Please consider applying! We look forward to reading your application.

Citizenship and Leadership Competition

Portfolios for 4-H Citizenship and Leadership competition are due into the State 4-H Office by January 22, 2024. More information can be learned by clicking on the link below in “related links.” For a guide to assembling a 4-H portfolio, please click on the following link: Portfolio Guidelines.  All other portfolio forms can be found online by scrolling down to “portfolio.”

 Related Links

Tennessee 4-H Congress Program Highlights

Sunday, March 10, 2024

  • 3:00 p.m. – Registration
  • 6:00 p.m. – Dinner Theatre and Opening Assembly – Embassy Suites Nashville SE, Murfreesboro
    Address: “Tennessee 4-H: Find Your Missing Piece”
    MaeLee Williamson, Tennessee 4-H Congress Governor
    Congress Pageant: “Tennessee, My Country Home”
    Directed by: Robin Beals

Monday, March 11, 2024

  • 6:15 a.m. – Breakfast – Embassy Suites Nashville SE, Murfreesboro
  • 7:30 a.m. – Board Buses for Day on Capitol Hill
  • 9:00 a.m. – Senate Assembly: “Know Your Government” – Senate Chambers, State Capitol
    Grace Carroll, Tennessee 4-H Speaker of the Senate, Presiding
    (4-H senators assume the role of senators)
  • 9:00 a.m. – Representatives Assembly: “Know Your Government” –  House Chambers, State Capitol
    Alex Snodgrass, Tennessee 4-H Speaker of the House, Presiding
    (4-H representatives assume the role of representatives)
  • 9:00 a.m. – Educational Sessions – Avon Williams Campus of Tennessee State University
  • 11:00 a.m. – Lunch – Avon Williams Campus of Tennessee State University
  • 12:15 p.m. – Senate Assembly:  “Know Your Government” – Senate Chambers, State Capitol resumes
    Representatives Assembly:  “Know Your Government” – House Chambers, State Capitol resumes
    Educational Sessions resume
  • 2:00 p.m. – Delegation Time – County visits to respective legislators, House and Senate Chambers, tour Nashville, dinner on your own
  • 7:45 p.m. – Board Buses to return to Embassy Suites Nashville SE, Murfreesboro, with Campaign Addresses and Regional Meetings to commence immediately upon arrival
  • 9:00 p.m. – Campaign Addresses

Tuesday, March 12, 2024

  • 7:30 a.m. – Breakfast Rotation – Embassy Suites Nashville SE, Murfreesboro
  • 7:45 a.m. – Election Polls Open – Embassy Suites Nashville SE, Murfreesboro
  • 9:00 a.m. – General Assembly – Embassy Suites Nashville SE, Murfreesboro
    Tennessee 4-H History Bowl
    Patriotic Program
    Service Project Presentation
    Announcement of 2025 Congress Officers
  • 11:00 a.m. – Buses depart for the Nashville Zoo
  • 12:00 p.m. – Nashville Zoo
  • 1:30 p.m. – Tennessee 4-H Foundation Board of Directors Meeting
  • 4:00 p.m. – Tennessee 4-H Foundation Annual Meeting
  • 3:45 p.m. – Board buses for return trip to hotel
  • 6:30 p.m. – Citizenship Banquet – Embassy Suites Nashville SE, Murfreesboro
    Installation of 2025 4-H Congress Officers
    Friend of 4-H Presentation
    Recognition of State Contest Winners
  • 9:00 p.m. – Inaugural Ball – Embassy Suites Nashville SE, Murfreesboro

Wednesday, March 13, 2024

  • 7:30 a.m. – Depart for Home

Each year one of the Congress highlights is the election of officers when delegates actually get to use voting machines to select their own State 4-H Congress Governor, Speaker of the Senate and Speaker of the House. A regional caucus is held prior to Congress to nominate candidates to run for office. To be eligible to run for a Congress office, delegates must be approved by the state 4-H office for membership in the Tennessee 4-H Honor Club. Following nominations, the election goes into full swing.  Installation of the new officers is held at the final banquet on Tuesday night.

Eligibility of Candidates

  1. A member of the current state 4-H council cannot run for a Congress office and cannot resign his/her current council position in order to be eligible to run for a Congress office.
  2. All candidates must be approved by the state 4-H office for membership in the Tennessee 4-H Honor Club.
  3. A candidate must be enrolled in the 9th or 10th grade on January 1 of the current year.

The 2024 Tennessee 4-H Congress officers are Alex Snodgrass, Jefferson County, Speaker of the House; MaeLee Williamson, Giles County, Governor; and Grace Carroll, McMinn County, Speaker of the Senate.

Eligibility of Delegates 

  1. All delegates must be duly registered in order to vote. To register, delegates will complete a voter registration form and receive back a voter registration certificate prior to election day.
  2. Current Congress officers are serving as leaders at Congress rather than delegates. Therefore, they should not register to vote. Likewise, public speaking, citizenship and leadership contestants, special acts and others who are not official Congress delegates should not register to vote.
  3. Only official voting delegates are eligible to serve as campaign managers or to take an active part in campaigning.

Voting

  1. Only senators vote for senators and representatives vote for representatives. Both senators and representatives vote for Governor.
  2. If there is a tie, delegates will vote in a run-off election.
  3. There will be no absentee voting.

Voting Reminders for Delegates

  • You will receive a voter registration certificate at breakfast on Tuesday. You will not be allowed to vote without your certificate.
  • You should be on time to vote. The polls open at 7:45 a.m. They will close at the time designated on the schedule.
  • When you enter the polling area, check in at your region’s table. A volunteer will direct you to the correct machine.
  • You will be using official voting machines for the elections. If you need assistance with operating the machine, a volunteer will be on hand to assist you.
  • You must have your voter registration certificate punched by a volunteer working the election. Keep your certificate in case there is a run-off election. You must show your card (with the hole punched) in order to vote in a run-off election.
  • For the first ballot, you will have two votes for each race. In case of a tie, there will be a second vote and you will vote for one person per race.

Campaign Material

  1. No campaign materials of any sort is allowed in the capitol.
  2. No campaign materials of any sort on tables at meals.
  3. No handouts, banners, or posters are allowed in the capitol or any assembly area – only that worn on the person is permitted.
  4. Each candidate will be allowed one banner. Banners must not exceed 4 feet by 8 feet. They must be turned in to 4-H headquarters by 5:00 pm on Sunday. The hotel staff will hang all signs.
  5. There will be no campaign material within 10 feet of voting tables.

Speeches and Appearances

  1. Candidates for Speaker of Senate and House are given 3 minutes each at their respective Know Your Government sessions on Monday morning. Only the candidates may speak.
  2. Candidates for Governor are given 3 minutes each at the Monday evening assembly. Only the candidates may speak. Following the speeches, each candidate will answer a question asked by the Governor, drawn randomly from a pool of questions developed by the current Congress officers in conjunction with the state 4-H staff.
  3. In the case of a tie a run-off election will be held, and candidates for the contested race(s) will have a chance to give 1-minute speeches between ballots.

Judging Procedure

  1. There will be a separate division for each grade (9th, 10th, 11th and 12th).
  2. Members will present a prepared speech not to exceed seven minutes* in length and will give an extemporaneous speech not to exceed two minutes in length.
    *For each 30 seconds the speaker exceeds the seven minute time limit, one point will be deducted from the final score. Five points will be deducted from the final score if the speech is less than three minutes in length.
  3. The prepared speech will count 75% and the extemporaneous speech will count 25%. Form 656A will be used as the scorecard for the prepared speech and Form 657 will be used for the extemporaneous speech.
  4. Members may enter the citizenship or leadership awards program in addition to the public speaking contest.

Score Cards

Awards

Region: One scholarship to State 4-H Congress for each of the two the top two 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grade division winners. Sweaters will be provided for those who have not previously attended State 4-H Congress.

speaker

State:  Each of the four first place winners (9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grade) receive an engraved bowl and a $100 cash award. The 12th grade winner will receive a $1,000 scholarship; and the 11th grade winner will receive a $500 scholarship. All other participants in the state contest receive a $25 cash award.

Donors

Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation (regional awards); Henry County Extension Staff (savings bonds); Lute Truett Memorial Fund (silver trays); friends and family of Lorna Norwood (college scholarship for 11th grade winner); family of Leon Foster (college scholarship for 12th grade winner)

2023 9th Grade Regional Public Speaking Winners

John Hancock – Wilson County (Central Region)
Sowmil Kumble – Williamson County (Central Region)
John Everett Martin – Knox County (Eastern Region)
Gracie Tindell – Union County (Eastern Region)
Catherine Gibson – Hardeman County (Western Region)
Marshall Woodall – Henderson County (Western Region)

2023 10th Grade Regional Public Speaking Winners

Gabe Harville – Smith County (Central Region)
Logan West – Macon County (Central Region)
Joshua Ransom – Johnson County (Eastern Region)
Meredith Whitley – Union County (Eastern Region)
Elisha Gaugh – Madison County (Western Region)
Isaac Welch – Wayne County (Western Region)

2023 11th Grade Regional Public Speaking Winners

Abigail Berny – Williamson County (Central Region)
Delia Marchant – Giles County (Central Region)
Olivia Castle – Washington County (Eastern Region)
Sophia Winauski – Sevier County (Eastern Region)
Haley Aldridge – Crockett County (Western Region)
Amelia Langford – Dyer County (Western Region)

2023 12th Grade Regional Public Speaking Winners

Allen Jones – Robertson County (Central Region)
Britta Gaetjens – Putnam County (Central Region)
Addie Brooks – Claiborne County (Eastern Region)
Cloe Murray – Roane County (Eastern Region)
Maddie Grace Thierfelder – Madison County (Western Region)
Chris Smith – Dickson County (Western Region)

* State Winner

4-H History Bowl

During the History Bowl, all three regions will have teams on stage at the same time. The competition will be conducted in two parts.

Part I

  1. There will be a pool of 12 questions with each team having the opportunity to answer four questions each without any competition from the other teams.
  2. The questions will be rotated between the regions. For example, the Western Region will have one question, then the Central Region, and the Eastern Region until all regions have had the opportunity to answer a question for a total of 12 questions.
  3. A correct answer is worth 10 points, and an incorrect answer will result in 10 points deducted from the team’s score. There is not penalty for an unanswered question.
  4. After the question is read, the team will have five seconds to answer.
  5. Scores earned in Part I will be added to scores earned in Part II to determine the winner.
History Bowl

Part II

  1. Each team will be seated at a table with a signal box. When a question is asked, the first team to press its signal button will have the opportunity to answer the question. The team whose signal light is activated will have the opportunity to answer the question even if another team answers without their signal light lit. After one signal button is pressed, no other signal will register. Be sure your signal is lit before providing an answer.
  2. The team with the activated signal will have five seconds in which to give an answer. Either member of the team may press the signal button and either may answer the question, but it would be wise for one team member to be sure of the answer before flashing the signal.
  3. If the signal button is pressed before the question is completed, that team must answer with no further information given.
  4. Correct answers are worth 10 points each. An incorrect answer or failure to answer after a team has turned on its signal light will take 10 points from a team’s score. There will be no partial credit for a question.
  5. A team that has negative 50 points drops out of the contest.
  6. The contest will continue until one team has either scored 200 points or the 30-minute timeframe has been reached, whichever comes first.
  7. If two or more teams are tied when time is up, a question will be asked to break the tie (other teams are not eligible).
  8. Scores will be kept digitally and projected onto the screen for the audience to see.

Awards

The two individuals making up the state-winning History Bowl team will receive engraved plaques and a $50 cash award. All other participants will receive a $25 cash award.

Donor

Janet Cluck, Dickson County

2023 Regional Winning History Bowl Teams

Western Region:

  • Cruz Martinez, Obion County
  • Paige Temple, Madison County
  • Alternate: Alexandria Foster, Hardeman County

Central Region:

  • Jalyn Baker, Giles County
  • Emily Chamberlin, Robertson County

Eastern Region:

  • Alyssa Hatcher, Jefferson County
  • Lyla Finch, Jefferson County
  • Alternate: Jackson Hall, Jefferson County

* State Winner

4-H History Bowl Bibliography

  1. 4-H Tennessee Tradition. Knoxville, Tennessee: State 4-H Office, 1987.
  2. Tennessee Blue Book. Nashville, Tennessee: Secretary of State, Capitol Building, Nashville, Tennessee 37219.
  3. Tennessee State Symbols, Simbeck, Rob, Altheus Press, Nashville. (Available in most book stores and public libraries.)
  4. Current events in Tennessee (daily newspapers, etc.)
  5. Tennessee State Homepage

History Bowl Sample Questions

  • Who is the University of Tennessee Vice President for Agriculture?
  • What is the name of Andrew Jackson’s home near Nashville?
  • What is the only county in Tennessee named for a woman?
  • Who designed our State Capitol?
  • Give the names and home towns of our two US senators.
  • Who is the most recent Tennessean to be a candidate for president of the United States?
  • Who wrote the song “Rocky Top?”
  • Each governor of Tennessee has been a member of one of three different political parties. What party other than the Democratic and Republican parties did some of our governors belong to?
  • Who was the only person to serve as governor of the state of Franklin?
  • Where in Tennessee was the first newspaper in the United States devoted to ending slavery published?
  • Who established the first 4-H Clubs in Gibson County?
  • What was the first name of Tennessee’s Collegiate 4-H program?
  • What Tennessee town was the first in the United States to be named for George Washington’s wife?
  • What is the name of the professional organization for Tennessee 4-H agents?
  • Who was the first native born Tennessee governor?
  • Eight counties are not named for men – name at least five of these.
  • Who is the chief executive of Tennessee? (name)
  • Who is the speaker of the Tennessee Senate?
  • How many justices are there on the Tennessee Supreme Court?
  • What is a governor’s “power of veto?”

While in the state capitol, delegates to Tennessee 4-H Congress have the opportunity to sit in the seat of their elected officials to the state legislature and vote on a bill. Delegates should study the bills and resolutions before their legislative session. They will have the opportunity to state their views and try to influence their peers regarding the bills introduced during the “Know Your Government” sessions of Congress.

Bills and the Resolution

Congress Essay Contest

Rules

  1. Each delegate to Tennessee 4-H Congress will prepare an essay of no more than 500 words on the theme Tennessee 4-H: Find Your Missing Piece.
  2. Each region will submit one essay for state competition. A state winner will be chosen from the three regional winners.
  3. Each essay will be judged on the following scale: 
    Subject matter – 50 points
    Grammatical composition – 30 points
    Originality-creativity – 15 points
    Neatness – 5 points
    TOTAL – 100 points

Awards

Region: 4-H cinch bag and $25 cash award to each of the regional winners
State: 4-H backpack to the state winner

Donors

Jenny Yeary (cinch bags and backpack)
University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Retirees Association (cash award)

2023 Regional Winning Essays

Eastern Region: Jackson Hall, Jefferson County
Western Region: Sarah Potter, Dickson County
Central Region: Zane Ritchie, Macon County

2023 State Essay Winner

Jackson Hall, Jefferson County

Judging Procedure

  1. There will be two divisions, senior Level I (9th and 10th grade) and senior Level II (11th and 12th grade).
    • Senior Level I (9th and 10th grade) awards will be based on the member’s project achievement portfolio counting 50% and a project interview  counting 50%.
    • Senior Level II (11th and 12th grade) awards will be based on the member’s project achievement portfolio counting 50% and a project interview counting 50%.
  2. During the interview, all participants (Level I and Level II) will be seated at a table, facing the judges. The only persons in the room during the interview will be the person being interviewed and the judges.
    • Level I (9th and 10th grade) participants will be interviewed through questions only. Level I participants are not to use any visuals, but a resume instead.  Please note: This is new for 2018.  Contestants will need to bring four (4) copies of their resumes with them.
    • Level II (11th and 12th grade) participants will be interviewed through questions only. Level II participants are not to use any visuals. The judges will be provided with a copy of each finalist’s resume from their project achievement portfolio.  Contestants are encouraged to bring copies of their resumes to the interviews.

Score Cards

Donors

Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation (scholarships to State 4-H Congress and trip to National 4-H Congress); Ieula Lee Endowment Fund (silver trays); Lori Gallimore (Horizon Award); Albert Gore, Sr. Memorial Endowment Fund (Level II educational scholarship); UTK College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (opportunity for Level I college scholarship); UTK College of Human Ecology (opportunity for Level I college scholarship); and UTM School of Agriculture and Applied Sciences (opportunity for Level I college scholarship)

2023 State Level I Citizenship Finalists

  • Caroline Garrell – Lincoln County (Central Region)
  • Logan West – Macon County (Central Region)
  • Gracie Tindell – Union County (Eastern Region)
  • EmiLee Lassiter – Warren County (Central Region)
  • Reeva Lalani – Williamson County (Central Region)
  • Shelby Thames – Williamson County (Central Region)

2023 State Level 1 Citizenship Alternates

  • 1st alternate: London Christian – Shelby County (Western Region)
  • 2nd alternate: Allison Keeler – Knox County (Eastern Region)

2023 State Level II Citizenship Finalists

  • Callie Smith – Jefferson County (Eastern Region)
  • Mason Valentine – Jefferson County (Eastern Region)
  • Ella Flynn – Macon County (Central Region)
  • Abigail Barnett – Sumner County (Central Region)
  • Hattie Martinek – Sumner County (Central Region)
  • Alivia Haylett – Williamson County (Central Region)

2023 State Level II Citizenship Alternates

  • 1st alternate: Hope Collins – Madison County (Western Region)
  • 2nd alternate: Jeremiah Tindell – Union County (Eastern Region)

* State winner

Judging Procedure

  1. There will be two divisions, senior Level I (9th and 10th grade) and senior Level II (11th and 12th grade).
    1. Senior Level I (9th and 10th grade) awards will be based on the member’s project achievement portfolio counting 50% and a project interview counting 50%.
    2. Senior Level II (11th and 12th grade) awards will be based on the member’s project achievement portfolio counting 50% and a project interview counting 50%.
  2. During the interview, all participants (Level I and Level II) will be seated at a table, facing the judges. The only persons in the room during the interview will be the person being interviewed and the judges.
    1. Level I (9th and 10th grade) participants will be interviewed through questions only. Level I participants are not to use any visuals, but a resume instead. Please note: This is new for 2018. Contestants will need to bring four (4) copies of their resume with them.
    2. Level II (11th and 12th grade) participants will be interviewed through questions only. Level II participants are not to use any visuals. The judges will be provided with a copy of each finalist’s resume from their project achievement portfolio.  Contestants are encouraged to bring copies of their resumes to the interviews.

Score Cards

Donors

Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation (scholarships to State 4-H Congress and trip to National 4-H Congress); Ieula Lee Endowment Fund (silver trays); Ray and Carolyn Humberd (Horizon Award); Albert Gore, Sr. Memorial Endowment Fund (Level II educational scholarship); UTK College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (opportunity for Level I college scholarship); UTK College of Human Ecology (opportunity for Level I college scholarship); and UTM School of Agriculture and Applied Sciences (opportunity for Level I college scholarship)

2023 State Level I Leadership Finalists

  • Lilly Anglin – Carter County (Eastern Region)
  • MaeLee Williamson – Giles County (Central Region)
  • Zac Ross – Knox County (Eastern Region)
  • Brinlee Bradford – Lincoln County (Central Region)
  • Levi Cullum – Williamson County (Central Region)
  • Sowmil Kumble – Williamson County (Central Region)

2023 State Level I Leadership Alternates

  • 1st alternate: Tessa Palma – Robertson County (Central Region)
  • 2nd alternate: John Everett Martin – Knox County (Eastern Region)

2023 State Level II Leadership Finalists

  • Bristol Brown – Anderson County (Eastern Region)
  • Amelia Langford – Dyer County (Western Region)
  • Delia Marchant – Giles County (Central Region)
  • Jonathan Tindell – Union County (Eastern Region)
  • Cade Simmons – Van Buren County (Central Region)
  • Reece Chandler – Weakley County (Western Region)

2023 State Level II Leadership Alternatives

  • 1st alternate: Dawson Harvey – Williamson County (Central Region)
  • 2nd alternate: Sarah Gilford – Carter County (Eastern Region)

* State winner 

Our Hands to a Larger Service

Delegates to the 2024 Tennessee 4-H Congress are being challenged to donate items to Love On Wheels. Love On Wheels provides a new suitcase filled with basic necessities for children entering the foster care system. They aim to provide stability and a stronger sense of self-worth to children in crisis as they transition into new homes.


We strongly encourage counties to promote this service project countywide, not just with county 4-H Congress delegations.

Volunteer Orientation Information | Volunteer Expectations | Awards and Recognition Handbook | Volunteers at Out-of-County Events